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Special Education » Special Needs Directory

Special Needs Directory

ABC Pediatric Therapy

Speech, occupational, and physical therapy and more in the treatment of Autism and ASD, Down Syndrome, Cerebral Palsy, Angelman's, oral motor and feeding disorders, Asperger's, Toricollis, and other developmental delays.
513-755-6600 (West Chester)
513-922-KIDS (5437) (Western Hills)
http://www.abcpediatrictherapy.com  

The Arc Hamilton County

 
 
The Arc Hamilton County serves as an advocate for better lifestyles, support for families and community education for people with developmental and intellectual disabilities. Affiliated with The Arc of Ohio (http://thearcofohio.org/), The Arc of the United States (http://www.thearc.org/NetCommunity/Page.aspx?pid=183), The Arc of Hamilton County provides information and referral, family support services, individual case advocacy, parenting training quality assurance reviews and more.
The Arc Hamilton County's Mission:
 We advocate for the rights and full participation of all people with intellectual or developmental disabilities through targeted services.
Vision
A community of open doors where all lives are celebrated and valued.   The Arc Hamilton County advocates for better lifestyles, support of families and the education of the public about important issues impacting people with developmental disabilities and their families.  
http://archamilton.org/

Autism Society of Greater Cincinnati

The Autism Society of Greater Cincinnati is a local chapter that is part of the Autism Society of America. As a chapter we support the options policy adopted by the Autism Society of America.
The Autism Society of America promotes the active and informed involvement of family members and the individual with autism in the planning of individualized, appropriate services and supports. The Board of the Autism Society of America believes that each person with autism is a unique individual. Each family and individual with autism should have the right to learn about and select, the options that they feel are most appropriate for the individual with autism. To the maximum extent possible, we believe that the decisions should be made by both the parents and the individual with autism.
Services should enhance and strengthen natural family and community supports for the individual with autism and the family whenever possible. The service option designed for an individual with autism should result in improved quality of life. Abusive treatment of any kind is not an option.
We firmly believe that no single type of program or service will fill the needs of every individual with autism and that each person should have access to support services, Selection of a program, service or method of treatment should be on the basis of a full assessment of each person's abilities, needs and interests. We believe that services should be outcome based to insure that they meet the individualized needs of a person with autism.
With appropriate education, vocational training and community living options and support systems, individuals with autism can lead dignified, productive lives in their communities and strive to reach their fullest potential.
ASA is dedicated to the increasing public awareness about autism and the day-to-day issues faced by the individuals with autism, their families and the professionals with whom they interact. The Society and its chapters share a mission of providing information and education, and supporting research and advocating for programs and services for the autism community.
The ASA believes that all individuals with autism have the right to access appropriate services and supports based on their needs and desires.
-Adopted by the ASA Board of Directors 4/1/95
http://autismcincy.org/

Beech Acres

Beech Acres Parenting Center offers parents guidance and support with its ultimate goal of strengthening parents' ability to raise children who achieve their unique potential.  Beech Acres Parenting Center taps the strengths in every family, and every parent, to help them achieve their goals.  We do this by providing information and services tailored to meet parent needs, culture, and interests.  To find out more about Beech Acres Parenting Center and parenting resources call 513.231.6630.
http://www.beechacres.org/  
Building Strong Marriages & Relationships                 My son has a behavior problem, and he needs help beyond what the school offers. But I don’t know how to get it for him. Can you help me find resources for him? Case management specialists coordinate services that help at-risk children and their families access support resources and navigate school/community systems.
Community Support Services                 My son has decided to move in with his dad, and I’m having a hard time with it. Can you offer me some support? A face-to-face meeting to help parents or caregivers determine the best approaches for dealing with family issues such as divorce, discipline, step-parenting and child development.
Consultation Services                 I’m worried about my daughter. She just doesn’t seem happy. She’s not interested in school anymore and she spends all her time alone. How can I help her? Counseling services are provided to children and families with emotional and behavioral needs in face to face sessions with a therapist.
Counseling Services                 I’m a single mom, and my child’s father isn’t around. I’m worried about how this will affect her. Is there somewhere I can go to talk to other single parents and get advice? Customized groups for children, parents and families are provided in a variety of settings throughout the Cincinnati area. Participants benefit by sharing experiences in a setting that provides interaction and learning in ongoing or short-term sessions.
Education & Support Groups                 I’m a first-time mom and I have no idea what I’m doing. I live alone and could really use some guidance and support on how to take care of my baby. A voluntary home-visitation program for first-time, at-risk mothers, targeting specific zip codes in Hamilton and ClermontCounties in Ohio.
Every Child Succeeds                 My child has a behavior problem, and I don’t know what resources and services are out there to help us. I wish I could talk to a parent who’s been through this. Can you connect me with someone?  
Family Peer Support                 I’d like some practical tips on being a great parent. Do you know of a workshop I can go to, where I can hear from parenting experts?  
For the Love of Kids                 I feel like I am constantly fighting with my teenage daughter. Is there someone that can help us come to an agreement on some things? A process that brings individuals together to improve communication and resolve conflicts. Mediation is often used to resolve conflicts between families, children and parents, divorcing parents, couples, step-families and others.
Mediation Services                      I think medication would really help my daughter with her emotional problems. Is there someone who can assess her to see what medicine would work best? Psychiatric assessment and medication management provided for children who are actively receiving Beech Acres Parenting Center Services.
Medical Somatic/Psychiatric Services                 My three-year-old has really bad temper tantrums and I’m not sure how to handle them. Can someone help me? An evidenced based counseling practice for children ages 3-12 that focuses on improving the caregiver-child relationship and increasing positive child behaviors.
Parent Child Interactive Treatment (PCIT)                 I’m trying to potty train my three-year-old, but I’m not having much luck. Is there someone who can give me some advice? An informational telephone line that provides callers with knowledge about parenting, child development and usual childhood challenges. Please contact 624-3400 to talk with a parenting expert.
ParentSource Information Line                 I need help getting my five-year-old ready to go to Kindergarten. Are there other parents who can direct me to community resources I can use?  
Power in Parenting                 My son doesn’t have many friends, and doesn’t seem to get along with the other kids in his class. Is there someone who can help him develop the skills he needs? Therapeutic mentors teach, coach and aide children and families to develop specific skills or to help an individual child with behavioral, emotional or developmental needs.
Therapeutic Mentoring                 I’d like to give something back to my community. How can I become a treatment foster parent? Provides temporary or long term substitute family care for emotionally, sexually or physically abused children. Our Treatment Foster parents are licensed, trained and share in the goal of stabilizing children and reunifying families.

Brian Injury Association of Ohio

The Brain Injury Association of Ohio  BIAOH is a statewide advocacy and education organization incorporated in 1982 to improve services and supports to Ohioans with brain injury and their families, and to promote prevention. In 1985, the IRS granted 501 (c) (3) status to BIAOH, affirming our tax exempt, not-for-profit status.  BIAOH is comprised of survivors, family members, friends and professionals working together to promote better understanding, rehabilitation opportunities and lifelong community supports to assist an individual in living as fully and independently as possible.
Funding comes from membership fees, conferences, private donations, fundraising projects, grants and contracts. Grants account for over ninety percent (90%) of BIAOH's annual budget. The majority of these funds are administered through the Brain Injury Advisory Committee (formerly the Head Injury Advisory Council) and Program within the Ohio Rehabilitation Services Commission, and involve both state and federal match monies.
BIAOH is one of forty-three state brain injury associations affiliated with the Brain Injury Association of America, Inc., based in Alexandria, Va.
Current Programs
Community Support Network (CSN) - seven staffed BIAOH "branch" offices, one in Toledo serving 8 counties, one in Cleveland serving 3 counties, one in Lima serving 9 counties, one in New Philadelphia serving 5, one in Columbus serving 5 counties, one in Cincinnati serving 4, and one in Marietta serving 7 counties where part-time coordinators, knowledgeable about local resources, work to link individuals with brain injury and their families with existing services. Coordinators also encourage networking and collaboration between area service providers and advocates to enhance, expand and better coordinate services for individuals with brain injury. (Ultimately, as funds become available, BIAOH hopes to establish and maintain a total of 15 CSN locations, providing services within all 88 Ohio counties.)
Helpline - responds each year to approximately 2,000 requests for information about existing programs and services, sources of assistance and educational materials. 1-866-OHIOBIA (within Ohio) or 614-481-7100 in the Columbus area. Heads Up Ohio - BIAOH's newsletter, distributed to approximately 3,000 members and supporters each quarter, reporting on the members' achievements, public policy affecting the disability community and information and opportunities about services, supports and/or training.
Annual Membership Meeting & Conference -Each fall BIAOH hosts a conference which draws from 250 - 300 participants on topics related to brain injury rehabilitation, community support services and public policy initiatives. Many just-for-fun events are incorporated in this annual get-together - DJs and dancing at the opening reception, make-it-and-take-it t-shirt workshops, etc.
Library of "Frequently Requested Educational Documents" (FRED) and educational videos.
Prevention Resource Clearinghouse - information, videos and sample materials about numerous local, state and federal prevention initiatives are available through BIAOH's helpline on topics such as bike helmet usage, seat belts, sports and recreation, car seats for children, etc. Legislative Education & Information - BIAOH currently offers a training program to approximately 30 individuals with disabilities and their families in central Ohio to identify public policy issues affecting their lives and to gain self advocacy skills and experience. (Funding provided through Arc Ohio through a grant from the Ohio Developmental Disabilities Planning Council.)
Support Groups - linkage to 50 volunteer-administered groups and/or contact people around the state, along with technical assistance to group leaders. Volunteer support group contacts for individuals with brain injury and their families are located in: Akron, Athens, Batavia, Berea, Butler County, Cadiz, Canton, Chillicothe, Cincinnati, Clermont County, Cleveland, Columbus, Dayton area, Defiance, Delaware, Dennison, Dover, Euclid, Findlay, Green Springs, Hamilton, Lima, Lisbon, Lorain, Marietta (Reno), Medina, Millersburg, Newark, Parma, Pataskala, Portage County, Seville, Sylvania, Toledo, Troy, Warren, Warrensville Heights, Warsaw, Wooster, Youngstown, and Zanesville.
http://biaoh.org/who.html



Cincinnati Center for Autism

The Cincinnati Center for Autism (CCA) provides a variety of services designed to help children with autism reach their fullest potential. Our programs address many of the behavioral, social, communication and motor delays common in children with autism.
The Cincinnati Center for Autism... • A non-profit 501 (c)(3) organization • Founded in 2003 • Serving families in Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky
CCA was formed to improve the condition of children, specifically children with autism. We use a variety of programs designed to provide education instruction, entertainment, recreation and social interaction in hopes of training for self support and useful, happy lives. http://cincinnaticenterforautism.com/

Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center (CCHMC)

Information for Families of Children With Special Health Care Needs When you have a child with special health care needs, you are faced with the constant challenge of finding information, resources and services. The Special Needs Resource Directory, created by the Center for Infants and Children with Special Needs at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, is a comprehensive reference tool for parents, caregivers and health care providers. It can help you quickly find local, regional and national web site links to:
Get information on specific disabilities Identify strategies to help you advocate for your child Develop community connections for ongoing support The Special Needs Resource Directory is a comprehensive accumulation of resources for the Southwest Ohio area. Resources unique to Kentucky and Indiana are also featured, as well as national and international web site links. Updates are made on an ongoing basis. 
We hope these resources will be helpful in the coordination of medical and psychosocial care for children with specialized chronic health care needs.
Adoption  Advocacy Alternative Therapies Assistive Technology  Calendar of Events Caregiver Resources   Clinical Trials  Day Care / Respite Definitions / Medical Terms Dental Care Disability-Specific Web Resources Discharge Planning Early Intervention  Education Employment Estate and Future Planning Family Networking and Support  Financial Assistance  Forms Foster Care General Medical Information General Services / Resources Guardianship Health Insurance Issues  Home Health Care and Durable Medical Equipment (DME) Hospice and Palliative Care Bereavement Resources  Immigration and Health Care  Indiana Resources   Kentucky Resources Medical Home Training  Mental Health Mental Retardation / Developmental Disabilities (MRDD) Nutritional Resources   Reading / Educational Materials Recreation opportunities, including summer programs and adapted toys Residential Placement Support Groups Therapy Transition Planning Transportation / Travel Wish-Granting Organizations How to Use the Special Needs Resource Directory The resource directory is designed to be a quick, easy reference for all parents and medical professionals, regardless of previous computer experience. Each page is named based on the topic it covers. If this is your first time using the internet, here are some tips:
Viewing Pages To view different pages within the resource directory, select the topic from the bulleted list above, or select the desired page from the list on the left-hand side of the screen. Links to Other Web Sites To locate links to other web sites, look for words that are blue and underlined, then move the cursor over these words and click once. Computer Access If you have difficulty accessing a computer, please visit the Family Resource Center or the Jack H. Rubinstein Libraries in Location D on the main campus of Cincinnati Children's. These areas also have resources related to children with special needs. Additional Resources on Special Needs The Division of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics at Cincinnati Children's provides diagnosis, comprehensive evaluation, treatment, training and education for infants, children and adolescents with developmental disorders.
Special Thanks The Special Needs Resource Directory, both print and online versions, was made possible through funding from the William Nutt Fund and the Bureau for Children with Medical Handicaps (BCMH).
Contact Us If your questions are not fully answered by our Special Needs Resource Directory, or if you have ideas for other helpful resources, please contact us via email.
Rev. 2/09
http://www.cincinnatichildrens.org/svc/alpha/c/special-needs/resources/default.htm?WT.mc_id=100254

Clovernook

Clovernook Center for the Blind and Visually Impaired
Our mission is to promote independence and foster the highest quality of life for people with visual impairments, including those with additional disabilities.
Clovernook provides comprehensive program services including training and support for independent living, orientation and mobility instruction, vocational training, job placement, counseling, recreation, and youth services.
In addition, our Business Operations provide meaningful employment opportunities for individuals who are blind or visually impaired, while at the same time manufacturing high-quality products for customers across the country.
Clovernook provides services out of offices in Cincinnati, Ohio and Memphis, Tennessee.
Our Services
Clovernook recognizes that each person who comes to us for services brings their own unique set of experiences and expectations. Consequently our services are never "one size fits all", but individually designed to reflect your preferences and goals. All direct service staff must be certified in CPR and first aid, and receive ongoing health and safety training such as universal precautions, consumer rights, as well as defensive driving and behavior support. All are trained in the HIPAA privacy laws and practices, and are obligated to adhere to Clovernook’s Code of Ethics as well as the ethical standards that apply in each of their disciplines. At Clovernook, we do not want cost to be a barrier for anyone who can benefit from our assistance. Many of our services are paid for in part or full by third party funding sources such as Medicare, state and county funding, private donations, and foundation grants. In cases where outside funding is not available, we will meet with you to determine an affordable self-pay fee that is based on your income and ability to pay. Administrative Staff (Cincinnati) Michael Walsh, M.A., Vice President of Program Services Tammy Dearinger, B.A., Manager of Employment Services Kara Foster, M.S., Manager of Vision Rehabilitation Services Administrative Staff (Memphis) Lynn Tune, M.Ed., Manager of Program Services Wakesha Clay, Receptionist Diana Dluhos, Administrative Assistant/Volunteer Coordinator Forms and Important Information Criteria for acceptance Consumer Handbook
http://clovernook.org/

Conductive Learning Center of Greater Cincinnati

Our Services Clovernook recognizes that each person who comes to us for services brings their own unique set of experiences and expectations. Consequently our services are never "one size fits all", but individually designed to reflect your preferences and goals. All direct service staff must be certified in CPR and first aid, and receive ongoing health and safety training such as universal precautions, consumer rights, as well as defensive driving and behavior support. All are trained in the HIPAA privacy laws and practices, and are obligated to adhere to Clovernook’s Code of Ethics as well as the ethical standards that apply in each of their disciplines. At Clovernook, we do not want cost to be a barrier for anyone who can benefit from our assistance. Many of our services are paid for in part or full by third party funding sources such as Medicare, state and county funding, private donations, and foundation grants. In cases where outside funding is not available, we will meet with you to determine an affordable self-pay fee that is based on your income and ability to pay. Administrative Staff (Cincinnati) Michael Walsh, M.A., Vice President of Program Services Tammy Dearinger, B.A., Manager of Employment Services Kara Foster, M.S., Manager of Vision Rehabilitation Services Administrative Staff (Memphis) Lynn Tune, M.Ed., Manager of Program Services Wakesha Clay, Receptionist Diana Dluhos, Administrative Assistant/Volunteer Coordinator Forms and Important Information Criteria for acceptance Consumer Handbook
http://ccfa.org/about/?LMI=0

Down Syndrome Association

Down Syndrome of Greater Cincinnati
 Who we are: The DSAGC is a non-profit organization established in 1981, with a history of responding to the changing needs of individuals with Down syndrome.
Who we serve: The DSAGC serves the southwest Ohio, northern Kentucky, and southeastern Indiana including Boone, Brown, Butler, Campbell, Clermont, Dearborn, Hamilton, Kenton, and Warren counties.
What we believe: We believe that knowledge empowers. By providing families with support, inspiration and information, we help individuals with Down syndrome achieve their maximum potential. We believe in inclusion. Including individuals with Down syndrome in neighborhood schools, community activities and the business world benefits both the individual and their respective communities.
Annual Reports 2006/2007 Annual Report (PDF) 2005 Annual Report (PDF)
IRS Form 990 2007 IRS Form 990 (1.3 MB PDF)
2006 IRS Form 990 (1.3 MB PDF)
DSAGC Brochure Download our brochure (PDF)
Our Mission
The mission of the DSAGC is to empower individuals, educate families, enhance communities and together, celebrate the extraordinary lives of people with Down syndrome.
The core values of the DSAGC are to:
Empower Individuals with Down syndrome by promoting self-determination and self-advocacy as they make choices in life, work and relationships.
Educate Families by providing quality support and information through inspiration, networking opportunities and educational programs.
Enhance Communities by cultivating the community of professionals, leaders and others so that anyone who impacts the lives of individuals with Down syndrome will welcome them with fairness, enthusiasm and encouragement.
Celebrate Extraordinary Lives.
http://dsagc.com

Epilepsy of Greater Cincinnati

Our Mission
The Epilepsy Foundation of Greater Cincinnati will ensure that people with seizures are able to participate in all life experiences; and will prevent, control and cure epilepsy through services, education, advocacy and research. Since 1953, the Epilepsy Foundation of Greater Cincinnati has been responding to the needs of people with epilepsy by providing quality and innovative services.
Service Area
The Epilepsy Foundation of Greater Cincinnati serves 12 counties in Ohio, including: Adams, Brown, Butler, Clermont, Clinton, Fayette, Hamilton, Highland, Lawrence, Pike, Scioto and Warren.
The Epilepsy Foundation of Greater Cincinnati serves 4 counties in Kentucky, including: Boone, Campbell, Grant and Kenton.
According to the 2007 U.S. Census Bureau Report, there is a total population of 2,331,923 persons living in the area that we serve! Since 1 to 2% of the population have epilepsy, statistically, there is anywhere from 23,319 to 46,638 people with epilepsy living in our service area.
The staff and volunteers of the Epilepsy Foundation of Greater Cincinnati work tirelessly to see that all of these individuals are served and that not another moment is lost to seizures.
Contact Information Epilepsy Foundation of Greater Cincinnati
895 Central Avenue, Suite 550
Cincinnati, OH 45202
Phone: (513) 721-2905
Toll free: (877) 804-2241
Fax: (513) 721-0799
e-mail: efgc@cincinnatiepilepsy.org
Employment Preparation Services
 Persons with epilepsy often need help in securing appropriate employment, and help on how to prepare a job application or how to prepare for an interview. The Skills Training Employment Preparation Services (STEPS) is an epilepsy-specific program designed to address the psycho-social aspects of individuals with epilepsy who wish to join the workforce. These aspects include: epilepsy education, seizure control, medication management, anger resolution, disclosure issues, attitudes, job seeking and job keeping skills.
STEPS helps people with epilepsy develop and refine the necessary skills for gaining employment. The program teaches assertiveness, self confidence, the power of positive attitude, motivation, resume building, proper business etiquette, how to resolve anger issues towards epilepsy, how to adjust to issues surrounding epilepsy, how to handle frustrations and how to manage stress. The program also discusses when and how to disclose to an employer that you have epilepsy.
The free classes take place at the main office of the Epilepsy Foundation of Greater Cincinnati (895 Central Avenue, Suite 550, Cincinnati, Ohio 45202).
Advocacy
Too often, the person with epilepsy may feel their rights have been denied. From Federal (ex: Americans with Disabilities Act, federal benefits) and State (ex: driving, employment) issues to individual client issues (ex: school/workplace discrimination), the Epilepsy Foundation of Greater Cincinnati advocates for both children and adults with epilepsy, fighting against discrimination. We offer support, if needed, by attending a child's school IEP (Individualized Educational Program) meetings and by offering training for school staff and students.
Having seizures may make your job hunt more difficult, but not impossible. We offer services in the workplace by communicating with employers and offering training to employers and fellow employees, as well as specialized training for the person with epilepsy who wishes to join the workforce and may need advice and guidance with obstacles (ex: when to disclose to an employer that you have epilepsy). If your epilepsy does reduce your ability to work, you may qualify for Supplemental Security Income (SSI) under the Social Security Administration. This program is designed to help people who have small incomes because they are unable to work or can only work a little. The eligibility requirements are complicated, but if you can show the SSA that your epilepsy hurts your ability to work, you may be able to get some assistance. Your best tool in the hunt for insurance or employment is to know your rights, know about your epilepsy, shop around and look into all the options available!
We participate in the Kids Speak Up! Program that takes kids with epilepsy to Washington D.C. to meet with their Senators and Representatives and learn early in their lives how to advocate for themselves.
It is important to know your rights as a person with epilepsy and to be an advocate for yourself or your loved one with epilepsy! Be aware of the facts about epilepsy and participate in awareness and advocacy programs. This knowledge will help you search for a job or insurance with confidence.
The Jeanne A. Carpenter Epilepsy Legal Defense Fund has been created to help people with epilepsy fight discrimination and to protect the civil rights of people with epilepsy by promoting education, advocacy and increased access to legal services. If you feel you have faced epilepsy-related discrimination and you want to challenge it, you can contact the Jeanne A. Carpenter Epilepsy Defense Fund at 1-888-886-EPILEPSY.
Every state has its own laws regarding driving with epilepsy. The laws differ in the length of time you must go seizure free before you may obtain a license. Some are 3 months seizure free, some are 6 months and some say you have to have no seizures for a year before you can get a license. Check with your local Department of Motor Vehicles for your state's laws. (Ohio's DMV:  http://www.bmv.ohio.gov/ )
Links
epilepsyfoundation.org
epilepsy.com
Monthly Professional Seminars
Photo Albums
 
http://www.cincinnatiepilepsy.org/home.php

Families with Autism Spectrum Disorders, Inc.

Welcome to Families with ASD! · 1 in every 150 children have some form of Autism
· Autism afflicts between 1-1.5 million Americans
· Autism is the Fastest-Growing Developmental Disorder in the Nation
· 172% Increase in the 1990's, and we don't know why.
· 80 % of marriages end in divorce within 5 years of diagnosis. Statistics on Autism Families with Autism Spectrum Disorders, Inc. <a,1)"#a17',0,0,0,0)"" http://familieswithasd.org/familieswithasd_003.htm Center <a,1)"#a16',0,0,0,0)"" http://familieswithasd.org/familieswithasd_004.htm Us <a,1)"#a12',0,0,0,0)"" href="http://familieswithasd.org/familieswithasd_007.htm">In the News <a,1)"#a11',0,0,0,0)"" href="http://familieswithasd.org/familieswithasd_002.htm">Meeting Info <a,1)"#a10',0,0,0,0)"" href="http://familieswithasd.org/familieswithasd_008.htm">Center Pictures <a,1)"#a9',0,0,0,0)"" href="http://familieswithasd.org/familieswithasd_009.htm">Fundraising <a,1)"#a8',0,0,0,0)"" href="http://familieswithasd.org/familieswithasd_010.htm">Links <a,1)"#a7',0,0,0,0)"" href="http://familieswithasd.org/familieswithasd_005.htm">Our Mission <a,1)"#a6',0,0,0,0)"" href="http://familieswithasd.org/familieswithasd_006.htm">Contact Us Home <a,1)"#a3',0,0,0,0)"" href="http://familieswithasd.org/2007%20asd%20autism%20yellow%20pages.pdf">ASD Yellow Pages
Who are we? 
Families with Autism Spectrum Disorders Inc. is a
501(c)(3), non-profit organization that fully funds the Families with ASD Autism support group, the founder of the annual 
Families with ASD Autism Expo, the author of the Autism Yellow Pages which is handed out free to families, and the founder of the first Autism Family Resource Center for the Greater Cincinnati, Northern Kentucky Area.

Why did we form this group?
If you have a child, or loved one with ASD, you have special challenges. Things as simple as going to the grocery may seem impossible. Our group gives us an opportunity to be with others that share in our experiences and understand these challenges. We love our children and want to share ideas and ways to help them.   Hopefully, our group will give us all some added strength and resources to help our children.

 What is our Goal?
One of our goals is to spread awareness and connect families. Each September we host the Families with ASD Autism Expo. This is a free event which helps families connect with local service providers that work with children and adults on the spectrum. We also host free monthly support group meetings for the whole family, and organize group outings and free holiday parties. It is much easier to attend a public event when you have those around you that understand. New this year we are proud to open the Families with ASD Autism Family Resource Center. This will serve as a point of entry for families new and old to the diagnosis of autism.

When?
Families with ASD meets monthly for casual family centered meetings. All meetings are for the entire family.   Please click on the meeting icon to get the latest information on upcoming meetings, times and locations.

Where?
Our meetings are on the Eastern side of Cincinnati. Please click on our meeting icon to get the latest time and locations for our upcoming meetings.

Future Plans?
 Families with ASD would like to open the Luke Gregory Center. A school that is for preschool to adults on the spectrum. We are looking for funding to make this dream come true.
Contact Us
(513) 528-1595 (513) 310-2548 4215 Edinburgh Drive Cincinnati, OH 45245
http://familieswithasd.org/



Cincinnati Children's

Help for Patients and Families The Family Resource Center at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center and at our College Hill Campus provides a serene environment for patients, families and staff. 
The Family Resource Center staff is a group of concerned professionals who listen to your needs and offer comprehensive, up-to-date information about your child's diagnosis or condition. We have several resources available to help you and your family, whether your child is a patient or not.
The Family Resource Centers offer a place to: Relax and unwind Read Access the internet and email Work with CarePages (patient web pages) Conduct personal business Obtain resources Learn more about childhood conditions Our College Hill Campus Resource Center offers resources available to help you, including:
Mental Health Lending Library Articles about conditions and diagnoses Support Groups Parent to Parent networks Upcoming workshops How to work with your child's school Parenting resources.
Professional Services The Family Resource Center at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center offers free information for patients, families, staff and educators. For our patient families, we offer laptop lines, computers with internet and email access and a fax.
Please visit or contact the Family Resource Center for help with:
Health conditions and diagnoses Setting up free, personalized web pages (CarePages) Programs and workshops How to work with your child's school in times of illness Support groups Parenting issues Information on growth and development Information about childhood health, safety and well-being Resources for the Hispanic community Things to do in the Cincinnati area Contact Us Our dedicated, compassionate and caring staff will assist you with any questions or needs you may have. Please feel free to contact the Family Resource Centers at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center Burnet Campus or College Hill Campus.
Phone For more information about the Family Resource Center at Cincinnati Children's Burnet Campus, please call us toll-free, 1-800-344-2462, ext. 7606 or 513-636-7606. You may also reach us by email, frc@cchmc.org.
For more information about the Family Resource Center at Cincinnati Children's College Hill Campus, please call us at 513-636-7808. You can also reach Julie Daisey by email, julie.daisey@cchmc.org.
Locations The Family Resource Center at our Burnet Campus is located on the second floor of Location D on the main campus of Cincinnati Children's. Take the elevators or stairs outside the cafeteria to the second floor. Follow the signs to the Family Resource Center. We are located in D2.70.
The College Hill Family Resource Center is located on the first floor of the College Hill Campus, located at 5642 Hamilton Avenue, Cincinnati. We are located in Room 1105, across from the cafeteria.
Hours Our hours of operation are:
Burnet Campus Monday - Thursday: 8:30 am - 6 pm Friday: 8:30 am - 5 pm Saturday: by appointment Holiday hours may vary.
College Hill Campus Monday - Thursday: 9 am - 5:30 pm Holiday hours may vary.
Mailing Addresses Family Resource Center Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center 3333 Burnet Avenue MLC 3007 Cincinnati, OH 45229-3039
Family Resource Center Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center 3333 Burnet Avenue MLC 3014 Cincinnati, OH 45229-3039
  Special Needs Resource Directory http://www.cincinnatichildrens.org/svc/alpha/c/special-needs/resources/default.htm?WT.mc_id=100254

Special Needs Directory

Families Living With Diabetes 779-4861 or melin@fuse.net Monthly support meetings for families living with type I diabetes.
First Steps 800-442-0087 • chfs.ky.gov/dph/firststeps.htm Early intervention that provides services to children from birth to age 3 with developmental disabilities and their families.
Food Allergy Awareness, Support and Training, Inc. (FAAST) PO Box 565, Loveland, OH 45140 588-6863 • help@faastcincy.orgfaastcincy.org Information and support for families with severe food allergies, including caregivers and teachers.
Hearing, Speech and Deaf Center 4440 Glen Este-Withamsville Road, Ste. 475, Eastgate • 947-8470 5900 West Chester Road, Ste. J, West Chester • 881-5911 A nonprofit offering services to promote better communication for all people.
Independent You 434 Springfield Pike 877-indy-you • independentyou.com A clothing store for people with disabilities.
Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation 8041 Hosbrook Road, Ste. 422, Cincinnati 793-3223 • jdrf.org/Cincinnati Information and support for families with children who have juvenile diabetes, as well as fundraising to support diabetes research. The Kelly O’Leary Center for Autism Spectrum Disorders inside Cincinnati Children's Hospital 636-5340 • cincinnatichildrens.org/autism A collaborative parent and professional program that provides diagnostic, treatment and support services, as well as a number of educational events for parents and professionals.
Kentucky Department of Education, Division of Exceptional Services 500 Mero St., Eighth Floor, Frankfort 502-564-4970 • education.ky.gov Handles funding of special education programs, data collection, personnel development, monitoring of school districts, curriculum development and more.
Kentucky Education Rights Center, Inc. edrights.com Working with families of children with special needs and the public school systems to ensure all children have access to the best educational opportunities.
Kentucky First Steps 800-752-6200 • chfs.ky.gov/dph/firststeps.htm An early intervention program serving children from birth to age 3 who show signs of developmental delays or specific medical conditions known to cause developmental delays.
Legal Aid Society of Greater Cincinnati 215 E. Ninth St., Ste. 200, Cincinnati 10 Journal Square, Hamilton 241-9400 • 800-582-2682 Helping families with special needs children maneuver and acquire special education.
Linden Grove (formerly The Trinity School) 4122 Myrtle, Cincinnati 984-2215 • thetrinityschool.org A state-accredited, non-profit, private school offering alternative educational opportunities for those who struggle in a more traditional academic environment, including children with ADHD, language processing disorders, dyslexia, sensory integration disorder, Asperger’s syndrome and high-functioning autism.
Love Quest Children's Foundation 661-7701 • lovequest.org Therapeutic horseback riding for the disabled.
Max’s House 2479 Crown Point Drive, Sharonville 600-6435 • besteele@maxhealth.com A day-care center for medically fragile children ages 6 weeks through 21 years, providing before- and after-school care, staffed by nurses and nursing assistants, as well as a special education teacher and special education curriculum. Also offering physical, speech and occupational therapy. Transportation provided. Funding available to most families (assistance with securing funding provided).
Milestones, Inc. 12372 Riggs Road, Independence 859-694-7669 • milestonesinc.org Therapeutic horseback riding for persons with disabilities.
Memorial, Inc. 3000 Vernon Place, Cincinnati 621-3032 • memorialinc.com A non-profit, neighborhood service organization with a special child advocacy division that provides information, support and advocacy for parents of children with special educational needs.
NAMI of Hamilton County 3805 Edwards Road, Room 556, Cincinnati 458-6670 • nami-hc.org Education, support groups and advocacy for those suffering with mental illnesses.
New Perceptions 1 Sperti Drive, Edgewood 859-344-9322 • newperceptions.org Offering a variety of programs for children through adults with developmental disabilities. Programs include First Steps Early Intervention, Developmental Education at Home, Developmental Therapy (physical, occupational and speech) and Employment programs for adults.
NorthKey Community Care 859-331-3292 or 877-331-9292 859-331-1792 or 877-889-1792 (TTY) northkey.org In- and out-patient services for children of all ages living with Asperger Down syndrome, autism and other developmental disabilities.
Ohio Coalition for the Education of Children with Disabilities • 800-374-2806 • ocecd.org Advocacy for education rights for families of children with disabilities.
Ohio Department of Education, Students With Disabilities 888-886-0181 • ode.state.oh.us Resources and tools for students with disabilities, as well as information on current legislation, individualized%2 disabilities. Programs include First Steps Early Intervention, Developmental Education at Home, Developmental Therapy (physical, occupational and speech) and Employment programs for adults.
NorthKey Community Care 859-331-3292 or 877-331-9292 859-331-1792 or 877-889-1792 (TTY) northkey.org In- and out-patient services for children of all ages living with Asperger Down syndrome, autism and other developmental disabilities.
Ohio Coalition for the Education of Children with Disabilities • 800-374-2806 • ocecd.org Advocacy for education rights for families of children with disabilities.
Ohio Department of Education, Students With Disabilities 888-886-0181 • ode.state.oh.us Resources and tools for students with disabilities, as well as information on current legislation, individualized education plans (IEPs), scholarship programs and preschool special education.
Ohio Valley Branch of the International Dyslexia Association 317 E Fifth St. • 651-4747 • cincinnatidyslexia.org Tutoring, testing and seminars for dyslexics.
Olympus Center 2230 Park Ave. 559-0404 • olympuscenter.org Diagnostic services and consultation for children and adults with learning problems. Also offers evaluations, home school achievement testing and programs like Fast ForWord. Redwood Rehabilitation Center 71 Orphanage Road, Fort Mitchell 859-331-0880 • redwoodrehab.com Provides therapeutic, vocational and educational services to children and adults with disabilities.
St. Joseph Home of Cincinnati 10722 Wyscarver Road, Cincinnati 563-2520 • saintjosephhome.com A non-profit ministry of The Sisters of Charity, the St. Joseph Home provides care to adults and children with severe mental and physical disabilities.
St. Rita School for the Deaf 1720 Glendale-Milford Road 771-7600 • srsdeaf.org A Catholic day and/or residential program designed to educate infants through high school students who require special communication methods.
Second Home Program 943-1900 • childwellnessfair.com Pediatric medical equipment recycling throughout the Greater Cincinnati special needs community.
Sensory Learning Center of Northern Kentucky 2149 Chamber Center Drive, Ft. Mitchell 344-8181 • sensorylearning-nky.com Provides the Sensory Learning Program, a multi-sensory approach to developmental learning that works to improve perception, understanding and the ability to learn. The program helps children and adults with autism, ADHD, developmental delays, sensory integration dysfunction and overall learning and behavior problems.
Sign N’ Say 1720 Glendale Milford Road 771-7600 • apraxiaeducation.org Sign N’ Say teaches phonics, rhythm, music, movement and other motor skills as well as teach sign language to help children communicate with their peers and adults.
Southwestern Ohio Special Education Regional Resource Center (SWOSERRC) 1301 Bonnell, Third Floor, Cincinnati 563-0045 • swoserrc.org Support and education for families with disabilities, including early childhood services and advocacy for special education needs.
Special Needs Adoption Program Kentucky Cabinet for Health and Family Services DCBS/Adoption Branch 275 E. Main St., 3 C-E • Frankfort 502-564-2147 • 800-928-4303 800-432-9346 • chfs.ky.gov Recruiting and preparing Kentucky families for adopting children with special needs.
Springer School and Center 2121 Madison Road • School 871-6080 Center 871-9174 • springerschoolandcenter.org Teaches students wi

Cincinnati Therapeutic Riding and Horsemanship

Cincinnati Therapeutic Riding and Horsemanship (CTRH) is a 501(c)3 non-profit whose mission is to provide a comprehensive recreational and therapeutic horseback riding program for children and adults with disabilities in the greater Cincinnati area. We are committed to the principle that people with disabilities are entitled to the same opportunities and rights as their non-disabled peers.
CTRH, a Premier Accredited Operating Center, operates under the rules and regulations of NARHA. Founded in 1985 by Sue Radabaugh, Chile Rodgers, and Bobbi Thies, CTRH served five riders in its inaugural year. CTRH has since grown to serve over one hundred riders in both hippotherapy and recreational riding classes. The growth of the program has been a testament to the quality of service and the response of the community from volunteers and contributors.
Our program would not exist without the people who give their heart and hands to volunteer. All that we are able to do depends on their assistance and availability.
Please remember that the instructor is managing horses, riders, volunteers, visitors and whatever else may be occurring in the surrounding area all at the same time. Therefore, if you are an observer, we ask that you sit quietly in the designated area. Only volunteers and riders are allowed in the riding arenas. NARHA standards limit the tack room, stall aisle way and arenas to riders and volunteers only.
We welcome any comments and suggestions.  If you are unable to speak to us before or after class, please call our office at (513) 831-7050 and leave a message--we will be in touch as soon as possible.  Just a reminder: the stable is only open to riders & volunteers during scheduled class times.  Visitors are not permitted on the grounds at any other time unless accompanied by an instructor or an appointment has been scheduled
Instructors and Therapists, Kellie Bowers * Alexis James * Carol O'Reilly * Jennifer Reid *Joelene Kammer Jennifer Dean, OT * Christine Sikkema, OT * Lauren Warm, OT
http://www.crh-horse.org/about_us/index.html